First Android Malware Found Exploiting Dirty COW Linux Flaw to Gain Root Privileges

By: sikur

dirty

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Tuesday, September 26, 2017 

Nearly a year after the disclosure of the Dirty COW vulnerability that affected the Linux kernel, cybercriminals have started exploiting the vulnerability against Android users, researchers have warned.

Publicly disclosed last year in October, Dirty COW was present in a section of the Linux kernel—a part of virtually every Linux distribution, including Red Hat, Debian, and Ubuntu—for years and was actively exploited in the wild.

The vulnerability allows an unprivileged local attacker to gain root access through a race condition issue, gain access to read-only root-owned executable files, and permit remote attacks.

However, security researchers from Trend Micro published a blog post on Monday disclosing that the privilege escalation vulnerability (CVE-2016-5195), known as Dirty COW, has now been actively exploited by a malware sample of ZNIU, detected as AndroidOS_ZNIU.

This is the first time we have seen a malware sample to contain an exploit for the vulnerability designed to compromise devices running on the mobile platform.

MORE: http://thehackernews.com/2017/09/dirty-cow-android-malware.html?m=1

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Red Alert 2.0: New Android Banking Trojan for Sale on Hacking Forums

By: sikur

Capturar

 September 18, 2017  by: 

The Recent discoveries of dangerous variants of the Android banking Trojan families, including FaketokenSvpeng, and BankBot, present a significant threat to online users who may have their login credentials and valuable personal data stolen.

Security researchers from SfyLabs have now discovered a new Android banking Trojan that is being rented on many dark websites for $500 per month, SfyLabs’ researcher Han Sahin told The Hacker News.

Dubbed Red Alert 2.0, the Android banking malware has been fully written from scratch, unlike other banking trojans, such as BankBot and ExoBot, which were evolved from the leaked source code of older trojans.

The Red Alert banking malware has been distributed via many online hacking forums since last few months, and its creators have continuously been updating the malware to add new functionalities in an effort to make it a dangerous threat to potential victims.

MORE: http://thehackernews.com/2017/09/android-banking-trojan.html

 

 

 

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BlueBorne: Critical Bluetooth Attack Puts Billions of Devices at Risk of Hacking

By: sikur

Capturar

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

By: 

If you are using a Bluetooth enabled device, be it a smartphone, laptop, smart TV or any other IoT device, you are at risk of malware attacks that can carry out remotely to take over your device even without requiring any interaction from your side.

Security researchers have just discovered total 8 zero-day vulnerabilities in Bluetooth protocol that impact more than 5.3 Billion devices—from Android, iOS, Windows and Linux to the Internet of things (IoT) devices—using the short-range wireless communication technology.

Using these vulnerabilities, security researchers at IoT security firm Armis have devised an attack, dubbed BlueBorne, which could allow attackers to completely take over Bluetooth-enabled devices, spread malware, or even establish a “man-in-the-middle” connection to gain access to devices’ critical data and networks without requiring any victim interaction.

MORE: http://thehackernews.com/2017/09/blueborne-bluetooth-hacking.html

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Over 500 Android Apps On Google Play Store Found Spying On 100 Million Users

By: sikur

By Swati Khandelwal

android-spyware-malwareOver 500 different Android apps that have been downloaded more than 100 million times from the official Google Play Store found to be infected with a malicious ad library that secretly distributes spyware to users and can perform dangerous operations.

Since 90 per cent of Android apps is free to download from Google Play Store, advertising is a key revenue source for app developers. For this, they integrate Android SDK Ads library in their apps, which usually does not affect an app’s core functionality.

But security researchers at mobile security firm Lookout have discovered a software development kit (SDK), dubbed Igexin, that has been found delivering spyware on Android devices.

MORE: http://thehackernews.com/2017/08/android-spyware-malware.html

 

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Google Detects Dangerous Spyware Apps On Android Play Store

By: sikur

By Swati Khandelwal

android-spyware-appSecurity researchers at Google have discovered a new family of deceptive Android spyware that can steal a whole lot of information on users, including text messages, emails, voice calls, photos, location data, and other files, and spy on them.

Dubbed Lipizzan, the Android spyware appears to be developed by Equus Technologies, an Israeli startup that Google referred to as a ‘cyber arms’ seller in a blog post published Wednesday.

With the help of Google Play Protect, the Android security team has found Lipizzan spyware on at least 20 apps in Play Store, which infected fewer than 100 Android smartphones in total.

MORE: http://thehackernews.com/2017/07/lipizzan-android-spyware.html

 

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Insecure Apps that Open Ports Leave Millions of Smartphones at Risk of Hacking

By: sikur

By Mohit Kumar

android-open-portA team of researchers from the University of Michigan discovered that hundreds of applications in Google Play Store have a security hole that could potentially allow hackers to steal data from and even implant malware on millions of Android smartphones.

The University of Michigan team says that the actual issue lies within apps that create open ports — a known problem with computers — on smartphones.

So, this issue has nothing to do with your device’s operating system or the handset; instead, the origin of this so-called backdoor is due to insecure coding practices by various app developers.

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Beware! Pre-Installed Android Malware Found On 36 High-end Smartphones

By: sikur

android-malware-appsBought a brand new Android Smartphone? Do not expect it to be a clean slate.

At least 36 high-end smartphone models belonging to popular manufacturing companies such as Samsung, LG, Xiaomi, Asus, Nexus, Oppo, and Lenovo, which are being distributed by two unidentified companies have been found pre-loaded with malware programs.

These malware infected devices were identified after a Check Point malware scan was performed on Android devices. Two malware families were detected on the infected devices: Loki and SLocker.

According to a blog post published Friday by Check Point researchers, these malicious software apps were not part of the official ROM firmware supplied by the smartphone manufacturers but were installed later somewhere along the supply chain, before the handsets arrived at the two companies from the manufacturer’s factory.

MORE: http://thehackernews.com/2017/03/android-malware-apps.html?m=1#author-info

By Wang Wei

 

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