A Single-Character Message Can Crash Any Apple iPhone, iPad Or Mac

By: sikur

Capturar

by Wang Wei

February 15, 2018

Only a single character can crash your iPhone and block access to the Messaging app in iOS as well as popular apps like WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, Outlook for iOS, and Gmail.

First spotted by Italian Blog Mobile World, a potentially new severe bug affects not only iPhones but also a wide range of Apple devices, including iPads, Macs and even Watch OS devices running the latest versions of their operating software.

Like previous ‘text bomb’ bug, the new flaw can easily be exploited by anyone, requiring users to send only a single character from Telugu—a native Indian language spoken by about 70 million people in the country.

Once the recipient receives a simple message containing the symbol or typed that symbol into the text editor, the character immediately instigates crashes on iPhones, iPads, Macs, Apple Watches and Apple TVs running Apple’s iOS Springboard.

Apps that receive the text bomb tries to load the character, but fails and refuses to function properly until the character is removed—which usually can be done by deleting the entire conversation.

iphone-crash-telugu-character

The easiest way to delete the offending message is by asking someone else to send a message to the app that is crashing due to the text bomb. This would allow you to jump directly into the notification and delete the entire thread containing the character.

The character can disable third-party apps like iMessage, Slack, Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp, Gmail, and Outlook for iOS, as well as Safari and Messages for the macOS versions.

Telegram and Skype users appear to be unaffected by the text bomb bug.

Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist

CFTC Offers $100,000 Bounty to Crypto Pump-and-Dump Whistleblowers

By: sikur

Capturar

by C. Edward Kelso

February 18, 2018

The US Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) has created a bounty to encourage whistleblowers coming forward in exposing “pump-and-dump” schemes. “Customers should not purchase virtual currencies, digital coins,” the CFTC warned, “or tokens based on social media tips or sudden price spikes. Thoroughly research virtual currencies, digital coins, tokens, and the companies or entities behind them in order to separate hype from facts.”

Pump-and-Dump Bounty

To eat at scammers’ anonymity at least, the CFTC is offering, “If you have original information that leads to a successful enforcement action that leads to monetary sanctions of $1 million or more, you could be eligible for a monetary award of between 10 percent and 30 percent.”

Customer Advisory: Beware Virtual Currency Pump-and-Dump Schemes is a two-page effort from the CFTC, “advising customers to avoid pump-and-dump schemes that can occur in thinly traded or new ‘alternative’ virtual currencies and digital coins or tokens.”

$100,000 Bounty Available to Crypto Pump-and-Dump Whistleblowers

As these pages have long documented, scams and schemes of old are reappearing anew in a space filled with inexperienced investors. For those familiar with, say, the American stock market experience, boiler room cold calls of yore, penny stocks, hot tips, and sure things are all haunting phrases investors have encountered at one time or another.

The ubiquity of message boards and of stock trading websites only encouraged scammers in this regard. Price action moved on pumps, on posts and general chatter about the potential of a given stock only a few were privy. Greed did the rest. Regulatory bodies in the US have had enough time to see their likes come and go.

$100,000 Bounty Available to Crypto Pump-and-Dump Whistleblowers

Old Wine, New Bottle

And while such scams seem new under the cloak of hip lingo such as cryptocurrency and blockchain and disruptive and game changer, it’s all pretty much the same old dance. Indeed, “Pump-and-dump schemes have been around long before virtual currencies and digital tokens. Historically, they were the domain of ‘boiler room’ frauds that aggressively peddled penny stocks by falsely promising the companies were on the verge of major breakthroughs, releasing groundbreaking products, or merging with blue chip competitors.”

MORE: https://news.bitcoin.com/cftc-offers-100000-bounty-to-crypto-pump-and-dump-whistleblowers/?utm_source=OneSignal%20Push&&utm_medium=notification&&utm_campaign=Push%20Notifications

Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist

US’s greatest vulnerability is underestimating the cyber threats from our adversaries, foreign policy expert Ian Bremmer says

By: sikur

Capturar

by Natasha TurakHadley Gamble

February 17, 2018

America’s greatest vulnerability is its continued inability to acknowledge the extent of its adversaries’ capabilities when it comes to cyber threats, says Ian Bremmer, founder and president of leading political risk firm Eurasia Group.

Speaking to CNBC from the Munich Security Conference on Saturday, the prominent American political scientist emphasized that there should be much more government-level concern and urgency over cyber risk. The adversarial states in question are what U.S. intelligence agencies call the “big four”: Russia, China, North Korea, and Iran.

“We’re vulnerable because we continue to underestimate the capabilities in those countries. WannaCry, from North Korea — no one in the U.S. cybersecurity services believed the North Koreans could actually do that,” Bremmer described, naming the ransomware virus that crippled more than 200,000 computer systems across 150 countries in May of 2017.

He also noted the NotPetya malware attack in July 2017, considered the costliest cyberattack in history, which U.S. and European governments have accused Russia’s military of implementing. Believed to be a deliberate attack on Ukraine, it actually wiped off half a point from Ukraine’s gross domestic product.

Borge Brende, president of the World Economic Forum, weighed in, stressing the economic cost of cyber crimes. “It is very hard to attribute cyberattacks to different actors or countries, but the cost is just unbelievable. Annually more than a thousand billion U.S. dollars are lost for companies or countries due to these attacks and our economy is more and more based on internet and data.”

MORE: https://www-cnbc-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.cnbc.com/amp/2018/02/17/munich-security-conference-ian-bremmer-on-cybersecurity-threats.html

Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist

Cyberattacks are the single greatest threat to global stability, German defense minister says

By: sikur

Capturar

by Silvia AmaroHadley Gamble

February 17, 2018

Cyberattacks are the greatest challenge threatening global stability, Germany’s defense minister told CNBC Saturday.

Recent cyberattacks, namely NotPetya and WannaCry, have shown that sensitive and personal data have become the target to destabilize companies and governments worldwide — creating what’s often described as a war, given the power of the information stolen.

When asked about the “single greatest threat to global stability,” Ursula von der Leyen, the German defense minister said: “I think it’s the cyber threats because whatever adversaries you can think of and even if you talk about Daesh (the terrorist group) they use the cyber domain to fight against us.”

Governments and several international groups have, as a result, boosted their efforts to better protect their networks against such attacks. At the same time, they have also stepped up works to become more offensive on the web against their enemies. The U.K., for example, is reportedly using cyber warfare in order to fight the so-called Islamic State.

According to von der Leyen, cybersecurity is going to be the main focus for this decade as both governments and companies try to protect their data.

“This decade will be the decade of improvement in cyber security and information ruling,” she said at the sidelines of the Munich Security Conference.

MORE: https://www-cnbc-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.cnbc.com/amp/2018/02/17/munich-security-conference-german-defense-minister-on-global-stability.html

Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist

Wendy McElroy: Privacy Prevents Violence and Crime

By: sikur

jail1.jpg

by Wendy McElroy

February 17, 2018

Unlike the communities traditionally associated with the word “anarchy”, in a crypto-anarchy the government is not temporarily destroyed but permanently forbidden and permanently unnecessary. It’s a community where the threat of violence is impotent because violence is impossible, and violence is impossible because its participants cannot be linked to their true names or physical locations.

— Wei Dai

A February 6, 2018 headline in Reason magazine warned, “Governments Hate Bitcoin and Cash for the Same Reason: They Protect People’s Privacy.” The ensuing article spun off a quote from U.S. Treasury Secretary, Steve Mnuchin, “One of the things we will be working very closely with the G-20 on is making sure that this doesn’t become the Swiss numbered bank accounts.” Mnuchin rejects decentralized crypto as payment, investment, or savings systems because it cannot be easily tracked by government.

Privacy is the battleground upon which cryptocurrency will ultimately rise or fall.  The engine of crypto, the blockchain, is founded on the premise of anonymity or pseudonymity. The blockchain was specifically designed to obsolete “trusted third parties,” such as central banks, which act as data-collection centers for government.

Wei Dai and Mnuchin may seem to be polar opposites on privacy, but they are saying much the same thing, although their conclusions are antithetical. Privacy prevents violence.

For Wei Dai, this is a good thing. Privacy is overwhelmingly positive for individuals because it empowers and protects them against government. Privacy can cloak genuine acts of violence or fraud, of course, just as free speech can promote lies; every tool can be a weapon. More often than not, however, the violence prevented is wielded by government against those who flaunt authority: tax evaders, dissenters, regulation breakers, gray or black marketeers, drug dealers and users. Government punishes scofflaws, whether or not the laws are just or despite the fact that participants consented. To cryptoanarchists, like Wei Dai, no crime has occurred unless a person is injured or property is damaged. The violence occurs when a third party forcibly intervenes between consenting adults or people minding their own business.

For Mnuchin, privacy’s role in preventing violence is a bad thing because he administers government coercion against peaceful individuals. Of course, he does not call it violence; he calls it law enforcement. That doesn’t change the fact that government agents are pointing guns at peaceful scofflaws, not at the behest of any participant, but over their objections.

Otherwise stated: Wei Dai praises privacy for promoting a society of “anything that’s peaceful.” Mnuchin excoriates privacy for the same reason.

MORE: https://news.bitcoin.com/the-satoshi-revolution-chapter-6-crypto-privacy-prevents-violence-and-crime-segment-1/?utm_source=OneSignal%20Push&&utm_medium=notification&&utm_campaign=Push%20Notifications

Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist

Hackers stole $6 million from Russian bank via SWIFT system: central bank

By: sikur

jail1

by Jack Stubbs

February 16, 2018

MAGNITOGORSK, Russia (Reuters) – Unknown hackers stole 339.5 million roubles ($6 million) from a Russian bank last year in an attack using the SWIFT international payments messaging system, the Russian central bank said on Friday.

The disclosure, buried at the bottom of a central bank report on digital thefts in the Russian banking sector, is the latest in a string of attempted and successful cyber heists using fraudulent wire-transfer requests.

The central bank said it had been sent information about “one successful attack on the work place of a SWIFT system operator.”

“The volume of unsanctioned operations as a result of this attack amounted to 339.5 million roubles,” the bank said.

After the report’s publication, a central bank spokesman said hackers had taken control of a computer at a Russian bank and used the SWIFT system to transfer the money to their own accounts.

The spokesman declined to name the bank or provide further details. He quoted Artem Sychev, deputy head of the central bank’s security department, as saying this was “a common scheme”.

A spokeswoman for SWIFT, whose messaging system is used to transfer trillions of dollars each day, said the company does not comment on specific entities.

MORE: https://uk.reuters.com/article/us-russia-cyber-swift/hackers-stole-6-million-from-russian-bank-via-swift-system-central-bank-idUKKCN1G00DV

 

Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist