Alemanha, a muralha da ciberdefesa global

By: sikur

gettyimages-491966818Com novas leis e parceria do governo com hackers, a Alemanha quer se tornar um modelo de defesa digital

Autor: Paula Soprana

25.09.2017

Era fim de tarde de uma quinta-feira quando o Bundestag, o Parlamento alemão, foi desconectado da rede. Congressistas não conseguiram acessar o sistema nem seus e-mails de trabalho naquela noite de 15 de maio de 2015. O governo tinha detectado uma invasão digital, em andamento havia semanas, e o desligamento dos sistemas era parte da reação. O Ministério da Defesa entrou em ação a fim de conter a ameaça. O sistema do Bundestag voltou a funcionar três dias depois. Ao longo dos meses seguintes, proliferaram diferentes versões sobre o dano causado e o conteúdo acessado. Houve pouca dúvida entre os investigadores alemães, porém, de que os atacantes tinham ligação com a Rússia. Desde então, o ambiente ficou ainda mais hostil para as eleições, as democracias e o debate público. Com a eleições legislativas de domingo, dia 24, os alemães se prepararam para novos ataques. A favorita, atual primeira-ministra, Angela Merkel, diverge abertamente do presidente autoritário da Rússia, Vladimir Putin.

Especialistas em segurança identificam entre as grandes ameaças dois grupos principais – Fancy Bear (Urso Chique) e Cozy Bear (Urso Fofo), também conhecidos como APT28 e APT29. O primeiro oferece perigo inversamente proporcional à tosquice de seu site, com animações infantis de ursos militantes.

MAIS: https://epoca-globo-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/epoca.globo.com/amp/tecnologia/experiencias-digitais/noticia/2017/09/alemanha-muralha-da-ciberdefesa-global.html

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Major cyber-attack will happen soon, warns UK’s security boss

By: sikur

By 

A head of the National Cybersecurity Centre predicts the most serious level of hacking will happen within years

In June, computers in more than 150 countries suffered a ransomware attack, including the NHS.

 

A “category one” cyber-attack, the most serious tier possible, will happen “sometime in the next few years”, a director of the National Cybersecurity Centre has warned.

According to the agency, which reports to GCHQ and has responsibly for ensuring the UK’s information security, a category one cybersecurity incident requires a national government response.

In the year since the agency was founded, it has covered 500 incidents, according to Ian Levy, the technical director, as well as 470 category three incidents and 30 category two, including the WannaCry ransomworm that took down IT in multiple NHS trusts and bodies.

But speaking at an event about the next decade of information security, Levy warned that “sometime in the next few years we’re going to have our first category one cyber-incident”. The only way to prevent such a breach, he said, was to change the way businesses and governments think about cybersecurity.

MORE: https://amp-theguardian-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/amp.theguardian.com/technology/2017/sep/22/major-cyber-attack-happen-soon-warns-uks-online-security-boss

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Hijacked software used to target tech giants

By: sikur

_97283021_gettyimages-821213532

From BBC News

22/09/2017

Hackers who booby-trapped widely used security software also used their malware to infiltrate machines at tech firms, suggests analysis.

Evidence that other companies had been compromised came to light as Cisco researchers probed how attackers got at the popular CCleaner programme.

Millions of people downloaded a Windows version that hackers had laced with malicious code.

Cisco said the attackers were seeking valuable intellectual property.

Cleaning up

Last week CCleaner creator Piriform revealed that attackers had managed to place a hijacked copy of version 5.33 that works on Windows on some download servers. The booby-trapped code was available for about a month between August and September,

MORE: http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-41359852

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1.9 Billion Data Records Exposed in First Half of 2017

By: sikur

images

by: Kelly Jackson Higgins

20/09/2017

Every second, 122 records are exposed in breaches around the globe, a new report shows. And that doesn’t even include the new Equifax breach data.

 More than 10 million data records are pilfered or lost every day around the world, a rate of more than 7,000 per minute: and that’s only the numbers from breaches that go public.

Some 1.9 billion data records were exposed in breaches in the first half of this year, a dramatic increase of 164% from the second half of 2016, according to the Breach Level Index for the first half of 2017, compiled by Gemalto.

“It blows me away at this moment that every single day, more than 10 million pieces of data are exposed,” says Jason Hart, vice president and CTO for data protection at Gemalto.

More: https://www.darkreading.com/attacks-breaches/19-billion-data-records-exposed-in-first-half-of-2017/d/d-id/1329929?elq_mid=80498&&elq_cid=23071917&&_mc=NL_DR_EDT_DR_daily_20170921&&cid=NL_DR_EDT_DR_daily_20170921&&elqTrackId=63987bfff3734837ad4490d577d696ba&&elq=a07b96d033cd41e88e62cf937517dc3e&&elqaid=80498&&elqat=1&&elqCampaignId=28083

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Hackers May Have Profited From SEC Corporate Filing System Attack

By: sikur

360x-1By Benjamin Bain  and Matt Robinson

The vulnerability of governments and businesses to cyberattacks was exposed again Wednesday when a top U.S. financial regulator said hackers had breached its electronic database of market-moving corporate announcements, and may have profited from the information they stole.

The hack of an aspect of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission’s Edgar filing system occurred in 2016, the regulator said in a statement. But it wasn’t until last month that the agency concluded the cybercriminals involved may have used their bounty to make illicit trades.

Edgar houses millions of filings on corporate disclosures ranging from quarterly earnings to statements on mergers and acquisitions. Infiltrating the SEC’s system to review announcements before they are released publicly would serve as a virtual treasure trove for a hacker seeking to make easy money.

SEC Chairman Jay Clayton said the agency’s review of the breach is ongoing and that it’s “coordinating with the appropriate authorities.”

MORE: https://www-bloomberg-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2017-09-21/sec-says-hack-of-edgar-may-have-led-to-illicit-trading-profits

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Canada’s privacy commissioner ‘very concerned’ about U.S. border phone searches

By: sikur

security-privacy-daniel-therrien

The Canadian Press

September 19, 2017

Canada’s privacy czar says Canadians should be “very concerned” about their cellphones, computers and other electronic devices being searched by U.S. border agents.

Daniel Therrien told a House of Commons committee Monday that U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers can look at mobile devices and even demand passwords under American law.

The privacy commissioner cited statistics indicating U.S. border searches of mobile phones had increased between 2015 and 2016.

He said the devices contain a lot of sensitive information and people should be very concerned.

New Democrat MP Nathan Cullen asked if that means no Canadian should cross the border with a phone, laptop or tablet unless they are comfortable with a U.S. border official inspecting the contents.

Therrien said yes.

More: https://www-cbc-ca.cdn.ampproject.org/c/www.cbc.ca/amp/1.4296331

 

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Red Alert 2.0: New Android Banking Trojan for Sale on Hacking Forums

By: sikur

Capturar

 September 18, 2017  by: 

The Recent discoveries of dangerous variants of the Android banking Trojan families, including FaketokenSvpeng, and BankBot, present a significant threat to online users who may have their login credentials and valuable personal data stolen.

Security researchers from SfyLabs have now discovered a new Android banking Trojan that is being rented on many dark websites for $500 per month, SfyLabs’ researcher Han Sahin told The Hacker News.

Dubbed Red Alert 2.0, the Android banking malware has been fully written from scratch, unlike other banking trojans, such as BankBot and ExoBot, which were evolved from the leaked source code of older trojans.

The Red Alert banking malware has been distributed via many online hacking forums since last few months, and its creators have continuously been updating the malware to add new functionalities in an effort to make it a dangerous threat to potential victims.

MORE: http://thehackernews.com/2017/09/android-banking-trojan.html

 

 

 

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Surveillance – How to secretly track cellphone users position around the globe

By: sikur

By Pierluigi Paganini

surverillance.png

Using the proper surveillance systems available on the market it is easy and quick to track cellphone and the movements of targets everywhere on the globe.

We recently discussed the decision of Wikileaks to publish copies of the criticized surveillance software FinFisher, highlighting the dangers for the militarization of the cyberspace and in particular for the use of spyware to track users.
The principal vendors of surveillance platforms defend their business declaring that the solutions are only for law enforcement and intelligence agencies. Unfortunately, the reality is quite different because many threat actors worldwide use surveillance malware to track individual for different reasons.

The Washington Post published an interesting article a few weeks ago on surveillance technology that can be used to track individuals anywhere in the world through the localization of their mobile devices.

The post explains that surveillance vendors using the SS7 protocol, aka Signaling System Number, are able to geo-localize users with great precision.

MORE: http://securityaffairs.co/wordpress/28397/hacking/surveillance-solutions.html

 

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BlueBorne: Critical Bluetooth Attack Puts Billions of Devices at Risk of Hacking

By: sikur

Capturar

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

By: 

If you are using a Bluetooth enabled device, be it a smartphone, laptop, smart TV or any other IoT device, you are at risk of malware attacks that can carry out remotely to take over your device even without requiring any interaction from your side.

Security researchers have just discovered total 8 zero-day vulnerabilities in Bluetooth protocol that impact more than 5.3 Billion devices—from Android, iOS, Windows and Linux to the Internet of things (IoT) devices—using the short-range wireless communication technology.

Using these vulnerabilities, security researchers at IoT security firm Armis have devised an attack, dubbed BlueBorne, which could allow attackers to completely take over Bluetooth-enabled devices, spread malware, or even establish a “man-in-the-middle” connection to gain access to devices’ critical data and networks without requiring any victim interaction.

MORE: http://thehackernews.com/2017/09/blueborne-bluetooth-hacking.html

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