Hacker Shows How Easy It Is To Hack People While Walking Around in Public

By: sikur

evil-twin-wifi-hackingWi-Fi enabled devices — widely known as the Internet of Things (IoT) — are populating offices and homes in greater and greater numbers.

From smartphones to connected printers and even coffee makers, most of these IoT devices have good intentions and can connect to your company’s network without a problem.

However, as the Internet of Things (IoT) devices are growing at a great pace, they continue to widen the attack surface at the same time, giving attackers a large number of entry points to affect you some or the other way.

The attackers can use your smart devices to gain backdoor entry to your network, giving them the capability to steal sensitive data, such as your personal information, along with a multitude of other malicious acts.

MORE: http://thehackernews.com/2017/02/hacking-in-public.html?m=1

By  – Entrepreneur, Hacker, Speaker, Founder and CEO — The Hacker News and The Hackers Conference
Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist

25% of healthcare organizations using public cloud do not encrypt data

By: sikur

A HyTrust survey of 51 healthcare and biotech organizations found that 25 percent of those organizations using the public cloud do not encrypt their data.

healthcare public cloud encryption

The survey also found that 63 percent of healthcare organizations say they intend to use multiple cloud vendors.

What is troubling, is that 38 percent of organizations that have data deployed in a multi-cloud environment that included Amazon Web Service (AWS) and Azure are not using any form of encryption. This vulnerability comes as 82 percent of healthcare organizations believe security is their top concern, followed by cost.

“Multi-cloud adoption continues to gain momentum among leading healthcare organizations,” said Eric Chiu, co-founder and president, HyTrust. “For these care delivery organizations, choosing a flexible cloud security solution that is effective across multiple cloud environments is not only critical to securing patient data, but to remaining HIPAA compliant.”

Key survey findings include:

  • 63 percent of healthcare organizations are currently using the public cloud
  • 25 percent of healthcare organizations using the public cloud are not encrypting their data
  • 63 percent of healthcare IT decision makers intend to use multiple cloud vendors
Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist

Post 2

By: sikur

post-6

Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist

Email scams target Mideast users

By: sikur

Millions of emails believed to have been sent by hackers to Mideast companies breach security systems

Fonte: Email scams target Mideast users

Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist

Edward Snowden’s New Job: Protecting Reporters From Spies #myprivacyback

By: sikur

By Andy Greenberg (@a_greenberg) wrote about Google subsidiary Jigsaw in issue 24.10.

When Edward Snowden leaked the biggest collection of classified National Security Agency documents in history, he wasn’t just revealing the inner workings of a global surveil­lance machine. He was also scrambling to evade it. To com­municate with the journalists who would publish his secrets, he had to route all his messages over the anonymity soft­ware Tor, teach reporters to use the encryption tool PGP by creating a YouTube tutorial that disguised his voice, and eventually ditch his comfortable life (and smartphone) in Hawaii to set up a cloak-and-dagger data handoff halfway around the world.

Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist

Spyware’s Odd Targets: Backers of Mexico’s Soda Tax #myprivacyback

By: sikur

Dr. Simón Barquera, the director of nutrition policy at Mexico’s National Institute of Public Health, received disturbing text messages, as did others who were vocal proponents of Mexico’s 2014 soda tax.
Adriana Zehbrauskas for The New York Times
By NICOLE PERLROTH

SAN FRANCISCO — Last summer, Dr. Simón Barquera’s phone started buzzing with a series of disturbing text messages from unknown numbers. One said his daughter had been in a serious accident. Another claimed to be from a friend whose father had died — with a link to funeral details.

Yet another message informed Dr. Barquera, the director of nutrition policy at Mexico’s National Institute of Public Health, that a Mexican news outlet had accused him of negligence, again with a link. And in more menacing messages, someone claimed to be sleeping with Dr. Barquera’s wife. That included a link to what the sender claimed was photo evidence of their affair.

MORE: https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/02/11/technology/hack-mexico-soda-tax-advocates.html?post_id=1415657668479226_1415658388479154#_=_

Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist

Enterprise Android Vs iOS: Which is More Secure? #myprivacyback

By: sikur

The answer is not as simple as you think. A mobile security expert parses the pros and cons.

By Satish Shetty is CEO and founder of Codeproof Technologies, an enterprise mobile security software company.

Both iOS and Android come with features that are designed to further secure enterprise applications over and above the security level of standard consumer apps. Both operating systems offer some way of segmenting enterprise data from user profile data, in effect, creating a secure container to install enterprise apps and store enterprise data. Furthermore, network transports can be secured on both platforms using technologies such as data encryption, app-specific VPN tunnels, and even some form of direct boot mode, where the device stops being a general purpose mobile device and instead becomes a dedicated device for accessing specific enterprise apps. These features are described in detail on the Android and iOS Web pages.

Both operating systems have also been found to contain pretty serious security vulnerabilities in the past. Both are vulnerable to malware attacks, although iOS less so than Android. And both are prone to exposure from potentially dangerous security vulnerabilities due to the installation of third-party apps.

MORE: http://www.darkreading.com/mobile/enterprise-android-vs-ios-which-is-more-secure/a/d-id/1328068

Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist Lorep ipsum Lorep ipsum, journalist