Hackers Threaten to Remotely Wipe 300 Million iPhones Unless Apple Pays Ransom

By: sikur

By Mohit Kumar

hacking-apple-icloud-accountIf you use iCloud to sync your Apple devices, your private data may be at risk of getting exposed or deleted by April 7th.

It has been found that a mischievous group of hackers claiming to have access to over 300 million iCloud accounts is threatening Apple to remotely wipe data from those millions of Apple devices unless Apple pays it $75,000 in crypto-currency or $100,000 worth of iTunes gift cards.

The hacking group, who identified themselves as ‘Turkish Crime Family,’ has demanded a ransom to be paid in Bitcoin or Ethereum, another popular crypto-currency.

MORE: http://thehackernews.com/2017/03/hacking-apple-icloud-account.html

 

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Overcoming the cyber-security skills gap: experience vs qualifications

By: sikur

At the recent RSA Conference, FireMon surveyed the attitudes of 350 IT security professionals towards the skills shortage.

The research revealed that when it comes to hiring, 93 percent of respondents think experience is more important than qualifications.  Furthermore, 73 percent said that it didn’t matter whether IT staff were college graduates when it came to getting the job done.

Respondents were split down the middle as to what was more important – good communication skills or the best technical skills.

More: https://www.scmagazine.com/overcoming-the-cyber-security-skills-gap-experience-vs-qualifications/article/645454/

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63% of Orgs Use Cloud, IoT Without Proper Security

By: sikur

US/North America News Reporter, Infosecurity Magazine

 17 MAR 2017

A full 63% of enterprises are using cloud, big data, internet of things (IoT) and container environments without securing sensitive data.

According to the 2017 Thales Data Threat Report, 93% of respondents will use sensitive data in an advanced technology (defined as cloud, software as a service or SaaS, big data, IoT and container) environments this year—and a majority of those respondents (63%) believe their organizations are deploying these technologies ahead of having appropriate data security solutions in place.

Interestingly though, while concerns about data security in cloud environments remain high, they’ve dropped off since last year. In 2016, 70% of respondents voiced worries about security breaches from attacks targeting cloud service providers (CSPs); in 2017, 59% expressed fears about this. That makes it still the No 1 concern, but by a far smaller margin than just a year ago.

The second biggest concern, cited by 57% of respondents, is “shared infrastructure vulnerabilities”, followed by “lack of control over the location of data” (55%). On the SaaS side, 57% of respondents report they are leveraging sensitive data in SaaS environments – up from 53% in 2016. When it comes to SaaS insecurities, respondents are most fearful about online storage (60%), online backup (56%), and online accounting (54%).

“Most major cloud providers have larger staffs of highly trained security professionals than any enterprise, and their scalability and redundancy can provide protection from the kinds of DDoS attacks that can plague on-premises workloads,” said Garrett Bekker, principal analyst for information security at 451 Research. “Perhaps as a result of the recognition of these public cloud security realities, security concerns overall for public cloud are waning.”

MORE: https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/63-of-orgs-use-cloud-iot-without/

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‘Fraude al CEO’, el email que está costando miles de euros a empresas españolas

By: sikur

AUTOR

15.02.201605:00 H.

Unos ladrones mandan un mail al contable de una empresa, haciéndose pasar por un alto directivo que le ordena una transferencia millonaria a una cuenta en China. El contable obedece ciegamente y la empresa pierde miles de euros. O millones. Es el ‘fraude al CEO’ y está creciendo como nunca ‘gracias’ a la tecnología. Cientos de empresas de todo el mundo lo están denunciando. En España, se ceba en las pymes.

A finales de enero, un banco belga anunciaba que le habían robado 70 millones de euros con el ‘fraude al CEO’. Pocos días después, un constructor austríaco de sistemas para aeronaves afirmaba haber perdido 50 millones con el mismo engaño. “En España empezó hace un par de años y tenemos cada vez más casos, nosotros detectamos unos 15 cada semestre”, asegura Alberto Redondo, Jefe de Delitos Tecnológicos de la Guardia Civil.

MORE: http://www.elconfidencial.com/tecnologia/2016-02-15/el-fraude-al-ceo-le-cuesta-miles-de-euros-a-decenas-de-pymes-espanolas_1151597/

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Study shows ignorance of and critical need to secure important documents

By: sikur

by Danielle Correa, Production Editor
March 14, 2017
There is a growing need to improve security practices of confidential documents that include information such as financial data, employee records, business contracts and intellectual property.
New research from the Business Performance Innovation (BPI) Network says there is a widespread and increasing need to improve security practices surrounding confidential documents in most organizations today.Businesses owners, CEOs, executives and knowledge workers from over 200 companies worldwide participated in the survey.

MORE: https://www.scmagazineuk.com/study-shows-ignorance-of-and-critical-need-to-secure-important-documents/article/644105/

 

 

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Cyber-espionage Tops Security Threats to Businesses

By: sikur

By

Cyber-espionage is the top threat facing businesses, ahead of targeted attacks and phishing attempts, according to new research.

Trend Micro’s research covered nearly 2500 organizations across Europe and the UK and found that 64% of businesses had experienced a ‘known’ major cyber-attack in the past 12 months. On average, businesses were hit by four cyber-attacks during that time.

Ransomware proved to be the most common type of incident, with 78% of respondents reporting an attack. Phishing (31%), business email compromise (17%) and cyber-espionage (15%) were other common attacks.

MORE: https://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/news/cyberespionage-threats-business/

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Cyber security: Experts warn on rise of hacker ransoms

By: sikur

Woman joggingImage copyright Science Photo Library

Smartphones, watches, televisions and fitness trackers could be used to hold people to ransom over personal data, cyber security experts have warned.

Ransomware, which makes devices unusable until their owners pay to unlock them, has become increasingly prevalent in the past year, they say.

Devices holding photos, emails and fitness information could be targeted.

The risk to business is “significant and growing”, the National Crime Agency and National Cyber Security Centre say.

MORE: http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-39260174#

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Comey says encryption stymies law enforcement, calls for ‘hard conversation’

By: sikur

FBI Director James Comey, who’s drawn criticism from both the left and the right for his handling of the Hillary Clinton email server investigation and a steady stream of national security leaks bemoaned the obstacles to law enforcement thrown up by encryption and said that Americans can’t expect “absolute privacy.”

“It is making more and more of the room of what the FBI investigates dark,” Comey said at a cybersecurity conference at Boston College Wednesday, the Boston Globe reported, though he maintained that he supported “strong encryption.”

MORE: https://www.scmagazine.com/comey-says-encryption-stymies-law-enforcement-calls-for-hard-conversation/article/642915/

 

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Beware! Pre-Installed Android Malware Found On 36 High-end Smartphones

By: sikur

android-malware-appsBought a brand new Android Smartphone? Do not expect it to be a clean slate.

At least 36 high-end smartphone models belonging to popular manufacturing companies such as Samsung, LG, Xiaomi, Asus, Nexus, Oppo, and Lenovo, which are being distributed by two unidentified companies have been found pre-loaded with malware programs.

These malware infected devices were identified after a Check Point malware scan was performed on Android devices. Two malware families were detected on the infected devices: Loki and SLocker.

According to a blog post published Friday by Check Point researchers, these malicious software apps were not part of the official ROM firmware supplied by the smartphone manufacturers but were installed later somewhere along the supply chain, before the handsets arrived at the two companies from the manufacturer’s factory.

MORE: http://thehackernews.com/2017/03/android-malware-apps.html?m=1#author-info

By Wang Wei

 

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Proposed Bill Would Legally Allow Cyber Crime Victims to Hack Back

By: sikur

By Mohit Kumar

hacking-back-hackersIs it wrong to hack back in order to counter hacking attack when you have become a victim? — this has been a long time debate.

While many countries, including the United States, consider hacking back practices as illegal, many security firms and experts believe it as “a terrible idea” and officially “cautions” victims against it, even if they use it as a part of an active defense strategy.

Accessing a system that does not belong to you or distributing code designed to enable unauthorized access to anyone’s system is an illegal practice.

However, this doesn’t mean that this practice is not at all performed. In some cases, retribution is part of current defense offerings, and many security firms do occasionally hack the infrastructure of threat groups to unmask several high-profile malware campaigns.

MORE: https://goo.gl/6Nse2r

 

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